A Trinity of New Books!

The Skaldic Eagle is please to announce more new books! All of these books are available in-person now from Eirik at East Coast Thing, Three Rivers Thing, and elsewhere. They are…

Odin’s Brew: Voices from the Heathen Northeast (August 2019)
• The first anthology published by Eirik’s Skaldic Eagle Press!
• Edited by Eirik Westcoat and Ned Bates.
• Foreword by Ristandi.
• Featuring nine heathen writers and artists: Ned Bates, Jill Evans, Stephanie Janicedottir, Laurel Mendes, Ristandi, Mike Smith, Jesseca Trainham, Perris Zoe Weiland, and Eirik Westcoat.
• Front cover photo by Angela Devin.
• The first-ever anthology of creative works centered around the East Coast Thing community.
• Just released mere days ago!
• See more details on the Odin’s Brew page.
• Or just jump to the Amazon listing to buy it.

Hail the Gods (October 2019)
• A smaller collection of poems from VPfHR, the first such collection from Skaldic Eagle Press.
• Cover art by Ermenegilda Muller.
• Not yet officially released, but now available from Eirik in-person.
• See more details on the Hail the Gods page.

We’ve Seen the Same Horizon: Poems of Awakening (June 2019)
• The first anthology anywhere to include Eirik’s poetry!
• Edited by Christina Finlayson Taylor and published by The Red Salon (not by Eirik or Skaldic Eagle Press).
• There are many other great poets in here as well, with lots of Norse/Asatru-themed material.
• The book has even garnered praise from Stephen Flowers (aka Edred Thorsson).
• Also available from Amazon, where you can read more about it.

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A Skaldic Eagle Takes Flight

Hatched from the Egg, he was hungry always;
that cosmic hailstone crafted such wyrd.
In size he surged, consuming carrion:
strong and stately, he stood at last.
He was sleek and fierce, but unsatisfied.
That fleshy fodder had fulfilled its end,
but such food no longer could feed his soul.
His keen cold eyes, they craved new vistas,
and his heart sought out the holy mysteries.
To the Cave he went, that court of darkness
and Lunar land of limitless night,
seeking its treasures for his soul’s triumph.
He came at last to cauldrons three
filled with the ferment of fathomless Spirit.
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Audio for The Rúnatal

Four weeks after its posting as text, I now present an audio recording of my poetic translation of the Rúnatal, which is Hávamál stanzas 138-145. For those who seek after the runes, there is much essential lore in these eight stanzas.

Here is the downloadable file of me reciting the poem:
Eirik Westcoat – The Rúnatal

And here is the inline player:

Enjoy! Feel free to share the file. For details, see the Creative Commons link below.

This post is:
Copyright © 2013 Eirik Westcoat.
All rights reserved.

The linked audio file of The Rúnatal is:
Copyright © 2013 Eirik Westcoat.
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives License.

Audio for The Mead Quest

I now present an audio recording of my poem The Mead Quest, which is a short poetic rendering of Óðin’s winning of Óðrerir, the poetic mead. For aspiring skalds in modern Asatru, this tale is perhaps the most important part of the mythology.

Here is the file of me reciting the poem: Eirik Westcoat – The Mead Quest

Enjoy! Feel free to share the file. For details, see the Creative Commons link below.

This post is:
Copyright © 2013 Eirik Westcoat.
All rights reserved.

The linked audio file of The Mead Quest is:
Copyright © 2013 Eirik Westcoat.
Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives License.

The Mead Quest

Here is one of my favorite early poems, based on the tale of Odin’s winning of the poetic mead from Snorri’s Edda. A version of the tale exists in the Havamal, but it clearly has some differences. I have written it as a lore poem in eight stanzas of ljóðaháttr. In this one, the spelling has been completely anglicized. Since mead is strongly identified with poetry in the Old Norse tradition, this tale allowed for a tight interweaving of the two concepts, especially in the first and last stanzas. (As a change, I have now put the first stanza prior to the break.)

The poem is called “The Mead Quest.”

Honor I Odin
by eagerly pouring
that precious and potent mead.
How he won
that wynnful draught:
that spell I speak in verse.

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